storing a gun

As a shooter, what’s your favorite pastime? It’s probably not cleaning your firearm. Owning a firearm is one thing; maintaining it is another. Cleaning isn’t fun, but it’s essential. Back in the days, rangers believed that if you shot with it, you had to clean it.

Here are the five tips on maintaining a sparkling barrel:

1. Bore brushes aren’t made equal

First things first, you must be equipped with the right tools. Are you unsure of what cleaning rod to go for? Shop for a carbon fiber one, instead. They come fitted with ball bearings, ensuring that you do not impose unsightly scratches on the barrel. Take your time to shop for a bore brush. You will thank yourself later. Professional marksmen believe that rods with large handles patch better. Try them out! Pro tip: Never use a steel rod on a steel barrel lest you end up with a scathed crown.

2. Clean off the debris first

Did you know that hunters spend more time carrying guns than using them? Carry guns are often used in harsh outdoor weather. Sadly, shooters treat them like first aid kits – always at arm’s reach but rarely serviced. Start by soaking the disassembled rifle in a vat for an hour or two. Just like detergents, it loosens dirt and physical debris, giving you an easy time afterwards. Most gun shops stock sonic cleaners instead.

Though not as effective as vat, they’re better than a solvent-soaked miniature brush. At the bore, you’ll use a patch, bore solvent and a lot of free time – more so if the rifle is covered with earthy matter. Consider getting an air compressor too: It will save you lots of man-hours. Keep the optics clean or if you think you need a new one, check out the latest Vortex optics for sale online.

3.When lubricating, less is better

Chances are, you were born in the early 90s and you believe in the generous application of WD-40 to any moving metallic component. Never do that to your gun – unless you want to reduce its lifespan (considerably). According to experts, you should lubricate sparingly. This means you shouldn’t use more than three drops of lubricant in each cleaning session.

4. Getting a workbench

What’s the perfect place to strip a rifle? Hint: it’s not on top of a computer desk. This is where most hobbyist shooters go wrong. Gun ethics dictate that they must be cleaned on a large flat surface for obvious reasons. With only two hands, it’s hard to hold a gun and clean it at the same time. A small vise comes in handy at such times. Get a small cup vise and drill it onto one edge of your work table. You can then clamp your handgun barrel for a hassle-free cleaning session.

5. Choose the right cleanser

a gun

The best solvents are multipurpose: They dissolve dust particles and clean the barrel while protecting it from corrosion. Isn’t this why CLPs (Cleaner Lubricant Protectants) are loved?

Life’s about making choices. Shooters believe that time is better spent on memorable activities, such as target practice. If you love shooting, then you better devote some time to clean your gun.